How to Tie a Sailor's (Carrick) Knot

How to Tie a Sailor's (Carrick) Knot

This knot's name dates back to at least 1783 when it was used by M. Lescallier in Vocabulaire des Termes de Marine. Its origins prior to that are not known with certainty. There are several possible explanations for the name "Carrick" being associated with this bend. The Elizabethan era plasterwork of Ormonde Castle in Carrick3-on-Suir shows numerous Carrick4 bends molded in relief. Or the name may come from Carrick5 Roads — a large natural anchorage by Falmouth in Cornwall, England. The name may also have been derived from the Carrack, a medieval type of ship. The eight crossings within the Carrick6 bend allow for many similar looking knots to be made. The lines in a "full" or "true" Carrick7 bend alternate between over and under at every crossing. There are also two ways the ends can emerge from the knot: diagonally opposed or from the same side. The form with the ends emerging diagonally opposed is considered more secure. Unfortunately, with so many permutations, the Carrick8 bend is prone to being tied incorrectly. In the interest of making the Carrick9 bend easier to untie, especially when tied in extremely large rope, the ends may be seized to prevent the knot from collapsing when load is applied. This practice also keeps the knot's profile flatter and can ease its passage over capstans or winches. The ends are traditionally seized to their standing part using a round seizing. For expediency, a series of double constrictor knots, drawn very tight, may also be used. When seizing the Carrick10 bend, both ends must be secured to their standing parts or the bend will slip. The knot can be tied using doubled lines for an even flatter, more elaborate appearance. From Wikipedia, the online Encyclopedia. Animated instructions from: Tollesbury . Fully illustrated, printed instructions can be found Here.  

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