Mrs. Martin’s Mashed Turnips

“They must not over-salt the leg; and then, if it is not over-salted, and if it is very thoroughly boiled, just as Serle boils ours, and eaten very moderately of, with a boiled turnip, and a little carrot or parsnip, I do not consider it unwholesome." Emma

The turnip, while an extraordinarily humble vegetable was, like the carrot and potato, one of the few fresh vegetables that could be counted on throughout the winter without the help of a hothouse. They provided a double benefit as well, since both the vegetable root and greens could be eaten. Turnips are quite a bit sweeter than potatoes and this recipe makes a lovely, fluffy side dish. White or yellow turnips may be used. mashed turnips

To Dress Turnips They eat best boiled in the pot, and when enough take them out and put them in a pan, and mash them with butter, a little cream, and a little salt, and send them to table. Hannah Glasse, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy
900 g / 32 oz / 2 lbs Turnips, peeled and chopped in 1” cubes 120 ml/ 4 oz/ ½ cup Cream 2 tbsp Butter   Place the turnips in a saucepan with enough water to cover them and boil them, covered, for 20-25 minutes, or until they are fork tender. Mash the turnips with an electric mixer until they are mostly smooth. Add the butter in pieces and the cream. Mash them again, allowing the butter to melt into the mixture. Serve at once. Serves 4-6
 
Excerpted from Cooking with Jane Austen and Friends by Laura Boyle. Laura Boyle is fascinated by all aspects of Jane Austen’s life. She is the proprietor of Austenation: Regency Accessories, creating custom hats, bonnets, reticules and more for customers around the globe. Cooking with Jane Austen and Friends is her first book. Her greatest joy is the time she is able to spend in her home with her family.

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